How long the tube journey between London Paddington underground and St Pancreas underground

Paddington station also known as London Paddington is a central London railway terminus. It is one of the19 station managed by network rail. It was designed by Isambard Kingdom Burnel. The destination served by this station includes Reading, Bristoll, Cardiff, Swansea, Oxford, New burry, Taunton, Exeter, Plymouth, Penance, Cheltenham, Worcester and Hereford.

The national rail station is officially named as London Paddington. The first underground station was opened as Paddington by metropolitan railway on 10 January, 1863 as the terminus of the line from farrington. The children’s book character Paddington bear was named after this station.

It has 1 fare zone. This station holds a history of many famous books and novels. The mystery novel 4.50 from Paddington (1952) by Agatha Christie starts with a murder witnessed by a passenger from a train from Paddington.

Hammer smith & City runs between Hammer smith and Barking via Paddington. St Pancreas also known as London St Pancreas and in 2007 also known as St Pancreas international is a central London terminus and Grade 1 listed building located on Estun road in the central area of London borough of Camden. The station is the terminus for East Midlands train’s services from London to Derby.

Between London Paddington and St Pancreas there are Edgware road underground station, Baker street underground station, Great Portland street underground station, Euston square underground station. It’s a 3.9 km distance from London Paddington underground station to St Pancreas underground station. Trains are available between these stations in every 10 minutes. It has a walking distance of about 5.2kms between London Paddington and St Pancreas international which takes about 1 hrs 25 min. St Pancreas international is the biggest interchange station on the London underground, serving six lines on four pair of tracks as well as two national rail stations.

This entry was posted in London Transports. Bookmark the permalink.

Comments are closed.